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for future bailouts. but making large depositors pay will hurt the wider economy, too. and that's the big question. yes, cyprus has been saved from bankruptcy and will remain in the euro zone, but at what price? some are estimating that with the reduction in the banking sector and with higher taxes, the cypriot economy could shrink by 10%. with years of hardship. and that is the big unknown. will the rescue end uncertainty or will cyprus end up like some of the other bailed out countries, with a lost generation, facing recession and job losses? >> pretty grim prospects in cyprus. and in a speech to the cypriot people tonight, the president called the deal painful but he said it was the best he could get. for more on the reaction there, i spoke to the bb's tim wilcox. we have now some clarity on the deal that cyprus has struck with europe. does it look like the island's actually going to be worse off because of this? >> it's instinct because i've just been talking to one of the m.p.'s who voted against the proposals last week, which was going to have a 10% levy or hair cut on deposits over
are seeing now is basically trying to achieve a dynamic in the economy that is unsustainable long-term and therefore we come to the detriment of future generations and therefore i am quite concerned that keeping monetary and fiscal policies very loose for an unsustainable long period of time might generate numbers we see now that looks good for current generations but actually come at the expense of future generations. i'm quite concerned in whether we are really trying to counter something that would look at as being typical, but if it is more structural would look to a lot of stimulus at it and undermine the future. i'm quite concerned about that aspect of what we are doing. >> thank you. >> i think you have it right. he spoke of allowing people to have higher living standards, more choices in their lives and a little bit more comfortably. i can't resist taking the opportunity though to disagree with the broad spirits of his last comment. i do not leave the long run can be seated to the avatars of austerity. i am the father or stepfather of six children and on their behalf i am
cyprus get to this point? >> it is a small country. its economy is based on three things. tourism, a very pleasant place for people to go. shipping, as befits an island. above all, what is euphemistically called finance. in the 1990's and early in this century, what the banks in cyprus did was offer themselves around the world as a wonderful place to come and make a deposit. we will convert whatever currency you have into euros, which is a very good currency to have. we will pay you an unusually high interest rate and ask no questions. this is often called good banking. they got a lot of deposits. depending on the estimates you believe, the total deposits in the bank of cyprus or five to eight times larger than the total gdp of that economy, which is an absurd situation. and those banks in cyprus took all of those deposits and they did what banks are supposed to do, find prudent, safe, non- risky investments. like all the banks and the last 20 years, they failed. they found that investments. they did not to prudently. the banks fell apart. the whole cyprus economy, already impacted by thi
say that cyprus' economy is going to be in significant peril in the future. >> warner: and i gather a lot of these big depositors are russians, other foreigners? how much is known about them? >> a lot of the deposits particularly at the major banks are certainly from russians. cyprus has, you know, a long history with russia. in recent years, we had a lot of russians coming to this island basically sort of seeking a safe haven for their money, given some of the instability in russia. what has happened, however, is that that has drawn suspicion over time that, for example, some oligarchs or even some money of questionable origin is in the banking system. that's one reason why european leaders and particularly chancellor angela merkel wanted to take a much closer look at cyprus' banking sector as a part of this whole bailout. >> warner: how fundamentally will the cyprus economy be restructured or changed? >> the cyprus economy basically lives and breathes on finance. ever since it joined the european union it has shifted away from an economy that had produced a lot of goods over many
that shifts the fundamentals of our economy. the industrial revolution and introduction of the changes in society are powered by the exponential technology that changes the pace of everything from how we communicate and how fast we expect people to respond to things to our political system and the pace of how quickly things happen and being on constant feedback account millennials are the forefront of that. how we move forward in this fast-paced world the millennial are taking it in stride because that is the reality of how we go out and also it's brought us a sense of easing adaptability. it's brought us to be resilient in the economic crisis that has led to incredible youth unemployment and incredible debt for young people. young people are optimistic about their long-term economic future because they see that in one year it can be totally different because we saw how quickly it started and how quickly it might go away. there's a sense of optimism and social mindedness which i think came out of line 11 which is in the minds of a lot of this generation seeing our country in that momen
these kind of revolution that shifts fundamentals of our economy. you look at the industry evolution, the introduction of the automobile, all these changes in our society are powered by exponential technology, which changes the pace of everything from how we communicate and how fast we expect people to respond to things, to our political system and the pace of how quickly things happen and being on constant -- in a constant feedback loop. the ability to trade stocks in nanoseconds. so, millenials are at the forefront of that. we understand that as reality. so, other generations are running around saying, how do we adapt? good forward any fast-paced world. the millenials are taking it all in stride because that's the reality of how we agree up, and also brought the sense of ease and adaptability and the ability to be resilient, the economic crisis, which, wow, has led to incredible youth unemployment, and incredible debt for young people. young people are optimistic about their long-term economic future because they see in one year it could be totally different. we saw how quickly it
economy. that is the real engine of the economic prosperity. >>> plus the supreme court this week will hear two important cases concerning same sex marriage. shouldn't the black robe masters leave the important social decisions to the states and their democratically elected legislatures or referenda? let the people decide. "the kudlow report" begins right now. >>> first up, in recent weeks, he's become a conservative super hero icon. that following his triumphant speeches at the national prayer service and the cpac political conference. dr. ben carson has a message to roll back obama care, deal with the crushing national debt, and even a bib llically based call r a flat tax. that's what i love. is he the conservative that can save the gop? here is the aforementioned dr. ben carson. director of the pediatric division at john hopkins university. and with us this hour, cnbc contributors keith boykin. as always, dr. carson, great to see you. i'm reading one of many articles that you're retiring in 100 days. i wonder if you would share future plans, especially public service. >> i have
to the economy and see if there is someway to manipulate the rates here in san francisco so perhaps some of the subsidies that are currently going to carbon get reallocated and redirected to support renewables and maybe that way make the carbon more expensive. i know there is an artificial reduction for strong support for natural gas. we are going return to carbon base is fluctuated widely and get support of the union and labor and local businesses so we move forward as quickly as possible. thank you very much. thank you, very much, next speaker please. >> hello, my name is marina. i'm a resident of san francisco. i want to thank the commission from what i have heard that they have heard the public support for the robust build out of the program. i think it's time to move forward to the next step and prove from the conceptual idea of a robust build out in terms of a real plan on actual projection of real jobs. i find it increasingly difficult to combat at the missions -- the build out. a plan for local generation and energy efficiency at the launch of clean power this sf is vital to the
that the controllers office had done, it wasn't measuring the job loss in the p g and e but the overall economy. >> that's correct. i was looking at the overall san francisco economy assuming that dollars spent on increase in electric bill would not increase other products. it did not focus on electrical work, but to that point, remember that the clean power sf program enabled by state statute remains for all p g and e customers for all services. it's only the supply of electricity that san francisco power program would then partner with p g and e to provide. if you are a resident of san francisco and member of the clean power sf group, your lights go out and you still go out and call a p g and e they roll out and respond to that outage and then refers the crews out for work. there is a very much heavy reliance, a partnership for implement thg program. >> for clarity, what you are saying to me is that we are not looking necessarily for any job loss for employees of p g and e based on how this is being rolled out? >> that is correct. the city's chief economist did not look at particular job sect
tax will be cut to 20%, the lowest tax rate than any other economy in the world. in his one-hour speech, chancellor osborne announced measures aimed at assisting small business owners, first- time homebuyers, and british veterans. this is about an hour and 15 minutes. mr. deputy speaker, this is a budget for people who aspire to work hard and get on. it's a budget for people who realise there are no easy answers to problems built up over many years. just the painstaking work of putting right what went so badly wrong. and together with the british people we are, slowly but surely, fixing our country's economic problems. we've now cut the deficit not by a quarter, but by a third. we've helped business create not a million new jobs, but one and a quarter million new jobs. we've kept interest rates at record lows. but mr. deputy speaker, despite the progress we've made, there's much more to do. today, i'm going to level with people about the difficult economic circumstances we still face and the hard decisions required to deal with them. it is taking longer than anyone
and that will lead to a decline in the money that is slowing around the economy and that means lower output essentially. so what we're looking at here in cyprus is that the retracted recession is not depression. let's continue with the discussion with professor pisteritus. thank you so much for joining us this morning. just how do you read the deal? did the germans win in the end? >> well, i would have to agree with you that what the germans wanted has happened in the end. it's an incredibly bad deal for the eurozone. cyprus is table because you are taking away from the island more than half its gdp. you're destroying small enterprises and the sector which accounted for 45% of gdp. expect unemployment to shoot up. we are not sure what the next step in this model is going to to be, but what has even wider implications is that the for the first time within the eurozone, depositors had to bail out ailing banks. and that happened in the 1930s. there were bank runs. we introduced deposit insurance. we introduced polling schemes for risk. in europe, we are headed for a banking union next year so
in macau's economy. 2013 will look good. melco crown and boyd gaming also a standout. "after the bell" starts right now. david: so here's question, when is it tir moyle actually good for the markets and the economy? well, when it is overseas. renowned professor jeremy siegel telling us why the european crisis could be a win for the u.s. and send the markets soaring to 16,000. liz: protesters are a win for us. we'll fund out more from dr. siegel. we know the feeling standing on the corner waiting for the taxis and being surprised how much that meter ran up while you sat there in the car with traffic. a new company hopes to make that aggravation go away by making taxis obsolete. ceo of sidecar is joining us. david: want to hear about that story coming up. we'll tell you what drove today's markets with today's data download. it is a down day on wall street as investors worry what is next for the eurozone. stocks gave up gains on all three major indices, ending the trading day low. industrials and materials led the decline. well the euro extending its losses against the dollar falling mor
questions on the british economy. i head of the budget address by the chancellor of the exchequer. he also talked about the eurozone bailout of cyprus. opposition leader@milligram said the situation in cyprus was undermining the basic trust across the eurozone. this is just over 30 minutes. time access to capital to fund those projects. >> order. questions to the prime minister. mr. philip david. >> mr. prime minister. >> thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, this morning i had meetings with minister colleagues and others and in addition to my duties in this house i shall o have further suh meetings later today. >> does the transfer every with me that today we need a blue-collar conservative project which has taxes are people who work hard, do the right thing and want to get on? stop spending billions of pounds we don't have on overseas aid where we saw -- helping with their cost of living -- [inaudible] >> first of all, can i thank the honorable frien thing for givine the opportunity to remind people that even before this budget in two weeks time there will be a tax cut for 24 million peop
. no doubt about that. it could hurt the economy by ten gdp points. joblessness but the banks were going collapse anyway. the economy would be in shambles anyway. there is concern that the depositors are hurt, because what is happening is if you have more than 100,000 in euros in the bank, those are targeted to help with the bail-out. $4.2 billion. a lot of that is from russian. a lot of -- he would cry about that. this is a good thing. bail-in, instead of bail-out. you take in a model where you are forcing the bank to save itself. the shareholders, bondholders and go to the uninsured depositors. this is a lesson we might take here. rather than the taxpayers bail-out you have the bail-out within the institution. i understand the pain but i don't think it's a bad idea. >> you float the idea of going after the saving account. it doesn't rez nay with many folks. >> but they weren't insured. they weren't insured over $100,000. here they aren't over $100,000. you know, you know when you put something in a bank like, that i covered the savings and the loan crisis in '80s. people were hurt in t
and howard ward. >> economy is getting better, capital chase returns and stocks continue to trend higher although there's profit taking here and there. >> okay. we'll take that to the bank. the key question about europe. it's all about credit quality. >> who do we have to worry about? >> spanish, italian and greece. >> you're very worried. >> people have to start doing their work. europe never did the work of fixing bank solvency in the first place. >> gentlemen, thank you for being here. >> happy monday. >> that does it for us today. make sure you join us tomorrow. right now it's time for "squawk on the street." ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >>> welcome to the last week of the first quarter. good morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." i'm carl quintanilla with melissa lee and jim kraker. futures reflecting the relief of the cyprus deal. a similar picture in europe where the italian tenure is now below where it was before those italian elections and a mixed picture in asia this morning. the nikkei up about 1.5%. the road map begin with the eurozone that did not collapse over the weekend so natura
their economy. based on ant was institutions,ree the commission, the ec be, and the imf. the commission has been working hard for many months to facilitate a sustainable i recallto help cyprus i raised the issue of financial results -- assistance program novemberirst time in 2011 with the finance minister of cyprus because of concerns about the sustainability and financial stability. been a particularly complex process in the most challenging of circumstances. already last week, we found ourselves in a situation where there were no optimal solutions ,vailable, only hard choices and that has been even more true in recent days. lagarde said the deal would restore trust in cyprus and banking system. >> it has been a laborious and could result. i would also like to salute the courage of the separate authorities -- the cypriot authorities who are taking on the challenge of putting into place and implementing in the days to, something that will number one protect the injured depositors, number two, treat the two -- the two troubled banks, and limit the treatment to those two banks, and therefore, rest
to see to tame these large banks and give us a stable financial system that supports the real economy, not just trading profits of a large financial institution. >> were you surprised by anything you heard at those hearings? >> i was. i viewed i, like a lot of peopl jpmorgan chase as a free will managed bank. i was surprised at them to build these huge positions and even when he started calling foul, the next level of management above him really didn't get on top of it. i was not surprised by appalled by the way they were manipulating their models that are supposed to be able to determine how much risk is involved in various trading positions. >> what advantage did they gain from manipulating those positions? >> well, there were a couple things going on. one was it was clear they were trying to boost their regulatory capital ratios in anticipation of new capital rules coming into effect. this is a key defect with the way regulators bank. regulators view capital adequacy at these large banks. they left those capital ratios to be determined in part by the risk models of the banks. the b
to the size of its economy. their banks are almost all entirely deposits. at least the two ones that were failing. most of the other banks in europe have a lot more junior and senior debt. big fat cushions that sit between potential losses and uninsured depositors. so the likelihood of this particular situation happening again? highly unlikely. but you're going to have to be more careful. that's the bottom line. bill? >> michelle, the question we're all wondering about here in the states and i guess around the world is will the cypriot banks will able to open tomorrow as had been expected? >> no. no. they've finally put out a statement and acknowledged what we were all beginning to realize would be true. they cannot. they're going to open up the two troubled banks on thursday, they hope. they claim they're going to open up nontroubled banks as well. that's going to be difficult. remember, banks talk to each other, right? there's all kinds of intrabank business that happens. it's going to be slightly problematic. we'll have to see how that plays out. plus we're going to see if there are ru
stuart: the highlight reel. all about cyprus. cyprus, they'll out approved. >> the economy is likely to get worse. >> continuation of stealing what has already been stolen. they will not be happy. >> they are devastated. that is not what cyprus is or ever was. >> europe does not have the mechanisms in place that the united states has to manage a currency or a banking system. >> watch the euro. that affects all of us. stuart: italian banks have been halted in trading. charles: yes. stuart: why? charles: they are worried. these stocks are plummeting. stuart: the dutch finance minister said the cyprus situation is a good template for other european countries. they have reached into private bank accounts, taken the money out and used it to finance the bailout. that is what everybody wanted to avoid and now the dow is down 43 points. >> that italian banks are frozen because now the fear is they will have their money taken out. stuart: the dutch minister is now staying this could prompt a euro zone bank restructuring. that is why the dow is now down 46 points. you have a 80-point
-year slowdowns in the economy. we had it in 2010, 2011, 2012. everyone is on the lookout for it again. i think what the fed has been doing represents a key difference between those three years and now, because then we had stopping and starting with qe. you had end dates. so you had the market in anticipation of ending and then wondering whether they were going to pick it back up again. because this is open-ended, i think the fuel that it provides is longer lasting and represents a key difference in part of the reason why i think we'll avoid this fourth consecutive slowdown. >> heidi, the other big story of the week is cyprus, of course. cyprus a tiny company. a big banking system that is a big percentage of the gdp of that tiny country. so how does this play out? how do you think this gets resolved? and should we worry about an impact in the united states? >> well, we definitely shouldn't worry that it's going to impact the united states, because we have different rules here. what happened in cyprus is europe likes drama. it's the birthplace of opera. it has the birthplace of a lot of forms of
of health has come out no. 1 after the economy. the economy is a little bit broad to deal with. that was no. 1. but health was came as far as something that we can do something about. the interesting one for no. 2 and this is the third or fourth year in a row that the quality of public education came out no. 2 and i think when people talk about small business issue, they don't think about that one. no. 3, no surprise, regulations. no. 4, taxation. no. 5, this is another one that i find can kind of interesting. last year it was actually no. 4, but infrastructure. small businesses are concerned about infrastructure, and it's been borne out again by the survey. as far as some of the interesting specifics of the respondents, 48% provide health insurance, 52% did not provide health insurance. interestingly enough and maybe i will talk a little bit more, 74% almost had never heard of the small business tax credit. 63% had never talked to their state senator. their assembly person or to the governor, which i think is a little scary and it's something that hopefully you as a commissioner will re[tp
a commitment to the economy of the whole region as to this particular project. having said that, the super bowl bid is an incredible thing and the strength of our bid is a collaboration of this whole region. this is how we think we will win this bid. this is not for any one particular city, it's us working together. not only on transportation issues, not only on cites, but all the hospitality that we have set. i want to thank all the regionals for working together. we want that super bowl xv very badly. we think we have the greatest opportunity to work for it and not only to win that bid, but to get ourselves in an incredible rotation for other super bowl hosting. we look at this long-term and it's the reasonable approach that will give us the strengths for the nfl to take into consideration. i want to be thankful for all the regions mayor's for joining us and the 49er organization. they brought us together at this time. it's going to be a great thing for san francisco. thank you. >> thank you for coming out. this is an amazing site. there are a thousand people working on this project today. th
records, taking, and larryeating bails glazer from the economy summit. and bruce is in pennsylvania where the snow has begun. reporter: well, neil, that heavy snow from this morning has turn into light snow this afternoon and now more of a freezing rain. literally minutes ago the sun made an appears and that is rare. no blizzard here but another significant snowfall. two or throw inches around most of the region, now a slushy mess. it began this morning. we expect it will not wrap up until late tonight. this is actually the 11th day in the month of march with some kind of trace amount of snow or more. none of them any big deal but all of them irritating. last month, one day with a trace of snow. temperatures much colder this march. the average high 15 degrees colder this march than last march, and just two days in the entire month of march that the national weather service would regard as clear, day where the sun was actually out. a fair number of fender benders this morning, but overall more of a slushy mess than a real danger. the temperatures are expected to get down near freezing, so
's going in the wrong direction now. sandra: saying more federal spending will help the economy, not something that all of us believe is true to be the case. >> no, but i got to go back a little bit there. it's absolutely true that he did miscalculate because neither the president nor myself nor many rational people -- sandra: would he admit that? >> yeah, i think he might, i don't know. nobody thought the house republicans were crazy enough to go through this ridiculous -- sandra: were they crazy? the sun came up. we get through the airport lines -- >> let me address that -- you guys had a ball on this, well, the sun came up, nothing changed. you may live to regret that because, you know, these problems are coming, and, in fact, today, michele bachmann, of all people, was decrying the sequester. why? because an airport in her district lost its tower and has been affected. the cuts are coming. in fact, the only thing that's fore stalled it a bit is the deal made on the continuing resolution. sandra: dan, i argue, however, immediately following, we saw the government, the adminis
that made you feel like republicans could have won. not very popular. you have a very weak economy. it was interesting that in the obama recovery, family income went down to $2,500 a year, where during the recession, income went down $1,500 a year. families were doing worse, yet extremely good campaign, and he won despite his disadvantages and he won frankly in a predictable way. he made the election about his opponent. the romney people allowed obama to define romney. this was rather than romney defining romney, and that is why it is important for republicans we do wrong? the idea that the republican party is in some terrible shape -- certainly i do not buy that. not buy that? >> i do not. i have been around since 1968. i have seen terrible shape. i remember watergate, i remember when the 13% of americans republicans, and the national if we should change the name of the party. whispereds not been now. >> for 40 years, the most number of republicans in the house was 192. today we have 230 something, and it is absolutely right to figure out what you did wrong, and the obama people o
, and the economy. without it, things simply can't exist. woman: we have good health in this country, in part, because we have clean water. and we shouldn't forget that, and we shouldn't take it for granted. melosi: in the late 19th century, serious waterborne disease epidemics were having devastating effects. roy: but then, in the early 1900s, we began to treat our water. and since then, we've seen a rapid decline in the incidence of waterborne disease. narrator: most cities treat drinking water through filtration, chlorination, and sometimes ozonation to kill pathogens in the source supply. these are complex treatment plants that cost millions of dollars to operate, but are necessary for our wellbeing. the treatment of drinking water has been called one of the greatest public health achievements of the last century. the water infrastructure itself protects the treated water until it comes out of our taps. it's been since 1911, since we had an outbreak of cholera or typhoid in the united states. but that doesn't mean that it can't happen. it can happen. if we aren't on our guard all the time
if constant budget deficits are going to ruin the economy they're taking an awful long time about doing so. the real fact about the budget is that the deficit has to be sustainable. but basically the government is a lot more like a company than it is like a household. and a company has debt as part of its permanent capital structure and it can have that debt forever. if the company keeps grog, it can take on more debt. similarly if we run a budget deficit, so long as it is small enough relative to the amount of economy is growing over the long-term that can be sustainable. we have to shrink the budget deficit over time, but not all the way to zero. the democrats are closer to correct on this point where the republicans have been attacking them because their budget doesn't balance over ten years. the budget shouldn't balance over ten years. >> i think you hit a key point. it's all about growth. you can grow your way out of deficits. we saw it during the clinton administration. it's also about looking at how far we've come. if you actually look at what we've already done in terms of getting
live" starts right now. >> megyn: fox news alert how one country's economy is saved from the brink of collapse in an unprecedented move that experts say comes at a major cost for anyone who uses a bank. think your money is safe? welcome to "america live" everyone, i'm megyn kelly. a tiny little island nation of cyprus has decided today that it will fix its financial crisis by taking people's money. and that's the ultimate solution. they will seize 30-- no, make that 40% being of every bank account in which the person has over 100,000 euros, about 120 or 30,000. and that's your thanks for having money in the cypriot banks and now there are questions about the global cost of the rescue and people find new limits to the trust we put in banks. greg palkot live in cyprus outside the parliament there. greg? >> reporter: yeah, that's right, that's right, megyn. the folks here in cyprus are breathing a sigh of relief, their country is not going bankrupt, but the price paid could be high for the people here and around the world. and with the european union to cough up its share of the money
nation of cypress is safe for now. the last effort to bail out and save its economy, but the solution that has bank depositors and investors everywhere now nervous. the largest banks are taking up to 40% of all bank deposits more than 100,000 euros or $129,000 or higher leaving smaller deposits untouched. optimism over the deal initially pushed the s&p 500 to within a point of its all time high of 1565 in early trading. stocks told off the cypress bailout is a template for the ways in which the eurozone will address future bank problems and bailouts. the dow jones industrial average fell 64 # points, s&p down five, and the nasdaq lost ten points. on the domestic front, president obama called upon congress to, quote, finish the job on immigration. speaking during a citizenship ceremony at the white house, president obama stressed the importance of getting something done. >> we have known for years that the immigration system is broken, not doing enough to harness the ingenuity of those who work hard to find a place here in america, and after avoiding the problem for years, the time has
demand. moreover because of stronger growth in each economy. it has the beneficial spillovers to trading partners. there will be a test later. thank you. ashley: there are always two sides of the story. central banks have been doing it all around the world. tracy: i know. peter barnes will bring you the q&a session of bernanke's comments when they have been live. ashley: let's check these markets. nicole petallides at the nyse. you are also looking at some big tech names. nicole: i am keeping an eye on blackberry and yahoo!. down almost 3%. goldman sachs downgraded. it is not really up to par and not really doing that well. they are not seeing the sales that they had hoped. let's take a look at yahoo!. it is up one half of 1%. 23.25 a share. back to you. ashley: barely up, but it is up. thank you. tracy: boeing announcing its plan to conduct a 787 and flight today. the troubled dreamliner has been grounded since early january. we heard last week they would do a little test flight. ashley: hopefully no smoke. with the securities and exchange commission approving nasdaq's plan to pay out t
't it? the economy is starting to improve. we're still seeing -- you know, you're talking two years out. i think the market's going to be at 17,000 in two years. i'm talking the opposite direction. i'm not a super, super bull. but in two years, i definitely think we're going to see, you know, lower unemployment. >> 3,300 down here. 17,000 up. >> that's a huge -- >> who's right? huh? >> i am. >> there you -- thank you, peter. >> thank you. >> see you later. heading toward the close. a day very much dictated by events overseas. the bailout of the cyprus banks seem to be a catalyst to the upside this morning. until the dutch finance minister had his say. but we are finishing well off the lows of the session. the dow was down 117 at the low of the day. and we're down about 50 right now. stay tuned. super bear harry dent is joining us on the second hour of "the closing bell." >>> welcome to "the closing bell," i'm sue herera in for maria bartiromo. bill will join me in a moment. not a great finish to the first trading day of the week. it started out so promising on news of a bailout agreemen
. by in large, of those 11 million, they're contributors to our economy. if we get it right and finally fix our broken system, we're going to have 11 million people contributing to our economy and it will be the biggest boone we could ever imagine to this economy. >> speaking of that, the economy and this economic impact, as you know, it's obviously a huge issue, and according to the center -- a study by the center of american progress, passing comprehensive immigration reform this year would create 200,000 jobs a year for the next ten years. it would add $1.4 trillion to our gdp, and it would add almost $800 billion in personal income. so the american people are going to pay a pretty heavy price if we don't get immigration reform passed this year and there's certainly an economic argument to be made. do you think that your colleagues on capitol hill, particularly those who are still resistant, understand how high the stakes are? >> i'm glad that these studies are being done. i think these studies are actually telling the truth. at the same time, unfortunately, i think the people afraid to vote
and the eurozone andng period of uncertainty insecurity surrounding the cyprus economy has in then. avertede we have iterally the possibility of bankruptcy and assure the prospects for generations to come. >> was it really aconite for cyprus? pension and insurance funds face major losses in the big banks. that will hurt ordinary people. lines of credit to small businesses could freeze. austerity will begin to eat into jobs, growth, and salaries. without a deal, cyprus faced immediate ruling. which is, the pain will still come, just perhaps more slowly. will nowd nation receive a $13 billion package of rescue loans, not enough, some predict, to avoid trouble down the road. in europe isry going to decide the pain of being inside the bureau is not risk losingn you 40% of deposits. >> without an agreement, cyprus would have become the first country to leave the euro. that has been averted. aanswered questions include or cost, to whom, and for how long? economice to an historian at the university of cyprus. he said the deal marks the beginning of a long and painful process of reform. >> disaster has
and the people are angry. the economy is on the edge. how is this a win? >> it is a win in a technical stents -- a sense. they would not fund -- because of that overnight agreement, that bankruptcy has been averted. on the ground, in reality, there are people there who are desperate to get money out. there are concerns in brussels about future bailouts. it is only a win in that very narrow definition of not having suffered the first bankruptcy of a national bank in the european union. but beyond that, we wait and see. >> as you indicated, this is not just cyprus. it is much broader. they are concerned to save -- to say the least. what guarantees do they have at their money is safe in the eurozone? >> if you are a small savor in the bank, bureaucrats here will tell you that cyprus was one off. yes, we came close to breaking bank accounts, but it did not quite happen, so rest calm. people responding to that is that so far, every time there has been a a lot or crisis, it has been a one off. greece was a one off and it could not happen again in that form. spain, portugal, italy. what's a cyprus h
, the economy will stop. we did a major outreach. we trained an outreach team, who went to every community meeting, to educate people on how bad the crisis was. not only did i tell people that we'd have to raise rates, i told them we'd have to tear up the city to repair this infrastructure. man: you can't simply say, "i won't use any water, it's too expensive." we have about 25% of our population that's at or below the poverty line, so you have to look at rate structures that are tiered so the people can pay their bills. franklin: we would love to have something like 75% federal money. we do get some federal aid and we are thankful, but on the other hand, we're paying for this primarily with new rates. we have increased our rates to among the highest in america. but not nearly as much as if we hadn't passed a one-cent sales tax dedicated to water and sewer infrastructure. hunter: that sales tax counts for about a third of the revenue of the department right now. franklin: we got 75% of the voters to agree to tax themselves so that their children and their children's children could have cle
think it makes a lot more sense that the economy is not growing. all we're doing is spending more money for the things that we buy and so it's a charade, a facade. looks like we're growing, but we're cotracting. i think that's going to get worse as time goes on. shibani: fueled by money printing. peter, always great to have you on. thank you very much for joining us today. >> you're welcome. shibani: switching gears and giving lou dobbs a chance of this. if the tiny med trainian island collapses, does it take the entire eurozone with it? i saw you taking notes. i know you want to jump in here, thoughts on what peter said? >> peter, i always enjoy listening to his perspective on the world. he said that cypress, you know, could happen anywhere. he did later acknowledge it waas an extreme example of banking and sovereignty gone wrong. here's the reality. cypress is now learning that it made serious mistakes. it trd to take the eurozone, the european commission, the international monetary fund and the e. cb to the brink. they play ad like fools. that's how they got in this position. they we
the decades- old privacy act to reflect our current digital economy. this hearing focuses on issues related to the lawful access to stored medications under current law. this committee will move toward modernization and reform after a thorough review and with input from all stakeholders. i look forward to working with all members on both sides of the aisle to modernize the electronic communications privacy act. >> thank you. the chair now recognizes the chairman and ranking committee of the full committee. wemembers of the committee, have heard in old -- in opening statements that were all for modernizing. this hearing could be very important with our witnesses telling us what kind of modernization we want. that is where this is all going. to hear both the chairman of the committee and the chairman of the subcommittee hit those points along with our ranking minority member, mr. scott. i have a list of digital due process coalition members, some 80 or more organizations with us on this. i would like unanimous consent to include this in the record. >> without objection. >> thank you. i conclu
opening concert about five weeks after that the economy completely crashed. my plan -- and i'm absolutely dogmatic about my plans --were delayed slightly. i would say that in this very difficult timefor the arts and everyone, especially the arts, it's phenomenal how new century has grown where many unfortunate organizations have stopped. during this period we got ourselves on national radio presence; we started touring, releasing cds, a dvd. we continue to tour. reputation grows and grows and grows and it has never stopped going forward. msk(music) >> the bay area knows the orchestra. you maybe take things for granted a little bit. that is simply not the case will go on the road. the audiences go crazy. they don't see vitality like this on stage. we are capable of conveying joy when we play. msk(music) >> any performance that we do, that a program, that will be something on the program that you haven't heard before. string orchestra repertoire is pretty small. i used to be boxed into small repertoire. i kept constantly looking for new repertoire and commissioning new arrangements. if you
economies. this is what they've been looking forward to. >> reporter: double slide and its scene nick views will be open to cars and sight seers and on lookers. >> we're excited about that. >> reporter: is this going to bring you back? >> definitely. >>> in honor of the new double slide bypass they've created a new beer, tunnel vision ale. >>> another major change, toll takers disappear this wednesday on the golden gate bridge. cost co, safe way or walgreens is where you can purchase your cards. you can drive through and wait for a bill to arrive in your mail. do not stop at the toll plaza. >>> another soldier from the bay area has been killed in afghanistan. james griffin died last thursday. he was from hayward, went to mt. event event event deny. this was his fifth overseas deployment. he's survived by his wife, parents and sister. >>> a man accused of killing at quant co says he's not the type to do this type of thing. marine core investigators say he killed lance corp practical and
business reporters carolyn said on an upcoming article about recovering local economy from dbi permit issuance. since the uptick in the amount of permits we've been issuing on buildings is probably a good sign in terms of how the economy is going, so, that's going to be an article that's going to be coming out soon. i guess that's it for the report today. >> is there any public comment on the president's announcements? okay. seeing none, item 3, general public comment. the bic will take public comment on matters within the jurisdiction that are not part of this agenda. ~ is there any public available? seeing none, we will move on to item number 4. discussion and possible action to elect bic officers. 4a, waiver of bic rules to hold bic offer certificate election on a different date, 4b, election of president, 4c, election of vice president. >> so, we wanted to get some action on waiving the rules of the commission because we wanted to postpone the election of the board president and vice president till the next meeting when more commissioners could be present. >> i move to waive the r
's remind otherwise of what we're talking about here. the cyprus economy is neither too big or too systemic to fail. fall is basically what the euro group has imposed on it. eats leaving it with almost no viable economy, certainly not to support the size of the economy it will grown to support. the trouble for cyprus being that they're going to have to take that pain and now the years ahead are going to be extremely difficult. we don't even know when banks are going to reopen. last night after those long negotiations when the cyprus manager left, julia stopped and asked him when people are going to be able to get their hands on their money. here is what he had to say. >> bearing that in mind, are the banks going to open on tuesday morning? >> i cannot say that. i cannot say that. it's always a mistake to say something like this when you are not completely sure. there is a lot 06 work to be done, but they will open very soon. >> and how long do you intend to use the capital controls for? >> that also i cannot answer. but, again, our objective to keep them as limited and is as short as possib
in a positive and constructive way to our economy and yield all sorts of innovation we can't even imagine right now, but it's probably going to be narrower slices. >> host: and we'll go back to todd shields of bloomberg news for more questions. >> thanks. on the unlicensed, it's an interesting concept. you mentioned needing big, powerful transmitters across big areas, but, of course, there's an alternative vision which is have a lot of smaller shrubbery, if you will. i'll work on the analogy more later, where we would have a lot of small wi-fi hot spots that would carry people's internet traffic. and i think that's some of what was behind the report you mentioned earlier about nationwide free service. now, whether anybody could build a network that thick and extensive and actually make it you pick bytously useful, i imagine, is another question. but there is a debate going on that you'll get to weigh in on which is when you design the auctions, how much of the airwaves should be devoted to these free, unlicensed uses versus should it be carpet remnant, or should it be a little bigger a chunk? t
is going to have some issues as well. and generally speaking the economy is likely to get worse as the conditions of the bailouts are rolled into place, as far as the street scene around here has been concerned and plenty of places taking credit cards and folks are sitting by cafes, and it's greek independence day and they're off and celebrating, not necessarily the bank out, but something indeed. stuart: thanks, rich. by the way people who are so vehement in the treat pstreet p, i believe they're bank employees and they may lose their jobs and their pensions as well and they're left with nothing and why they're so vehement on the streets there. let me go to the dow quickly. the dow is up 48 points that largely on the back of the settlement-- it's not a settlement, it's a bailout. cyprus gets it, up goes the dow, 14,557. all right. our next guest says that cyprus, what happened there, could unravel the entire euro system. economist peter morici joins us now, all right, peter. you've said this morning, i've read the article, that cyprus will be better off getting out of the euro
to to see where is the economy going. what got me excited about mark zuckerberg coming out, not only is he interested in high tech visas, he believes we should create path to citizenship for the 11 million undocumented in this country. the reason that's important, he recognizes that short of pathway to citizenship, what happens is we have 11 million residents living in our borders creating two classes of citizens in this country and that's not good for anybody. the fact that they're flexing their muscle, recognize their customer base, recognize the majority of americans, regardless republican or democrat or independent -- >> the naturalization ceremony and debate as we think of new immigrants come to the country becoming citizens of the united states, you look at the path to citizenship, there are several speed bumps that have gotten in the way. what we thought after the election was going to be at least from the outside looking in an easy piece of legislation moving forward, what's really in the way or is this just window dressing and they're going to get it done right after the break? >>
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